Peer Wellbeing Mentors

Your Peer Wellbeing Mentors are current ARU students who are here to help you through your university experience, available on campus and online.

The mentors deliver a range of social activities and campaigns throughout the year to promote positive wellbeing and the opportunity to meet other students. They also provide you with advice and guidance on a range of topics/issues and signpost to services within the University.

The Peer Wellbeing Mentors provide a listening service, drop in sessions, fun activities and events, info on ARU Counselling and Wellbeing Services, kitchen meetings with students, and they run the ARUTogether Facebook page.

You can email the Peer Wellbeing Mentors on your campus if you have any questions or want to talk about anything.

Just email chelmsmentor@aru.ac.uk or cambsmentor@aru.ac.uk

You can also contact them, take part in their online activities and follow them on Facebook: facebook.com/groups/arutogether


Meet our Peer Wellbeing Mentors


Ana Kuzma

Ana Kuzma

Campus: Cambridge
Course: Masters in Clinical Child Psychology
Nationality: Slovenian

“Being a Peer Wellbeing Mentor is an excellent opportunity for me to meet new people and transfer my experience and knowledge to other students.

Tips: My tip for students is try not to procrastinate, because it only causes additional stress. Take one day a week for self-care and do what you like the most, even if it means eating whole tub of ice cream.”


Anna Chiara Corriero

Anna Chiara Corriero

Campus: Chelmsford
Course: Medicine
Nationality: Italian

“Being a Peer Wellbeing Mentor to me means being there for my fellow students at ARU, to listen if they need a friendly hear or a good chat over a cup of tea.

Tips: make use of the resources given to you! Download apps, talk to peer mentors or Residential Assistants, follow the SU and ARU events to make the most of it all.”


Azeezat Periola

Azeezat Periola

Campus: Cambridge
Course: Law
Nationality: Nigerian

“Being a Peer Wellbeing Mentor allows me to support students, direct them to services in the University when they need help. Giving students the reassurance that things will be fine and that there is help if they need any is great.

Tips: Connect – get engaged with other activities. Try volunteering, join a society. Try something new and be active.”


Daisy Drieu

Daisy Drieu

Campus: Cambridge
Course: Psychology and Criminology
Nationality: English

“I became a Peer Wellbeing mentor right at the start of my studies as I loved the idea of being part of a group of people who’s only objective is to look out for our Peers, and continue to build the great sense of community at ARU.

Tips: Get involved with as many fun and engaging activities as you can, as it is a great way to relieve stress and make friends.”


Elena Miller

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Campus: Cambridge
Course: Child Nursing
Nationality: English

“I like helping and assisting people with difficulties, and sharing my experience with others so they can benefit from it, being a Peer Wellbeing Mentor allows me to do this.

Tips: Make time and be prepared; Take time out and relax; Be organised; Socialise in moderation.”


Jess Nelson

Jess Nelson

Campus: Cambridge
Course: Psychology
Nationality: English

“The main reason why I became a Peer Wellbeing Mentor is because, being a student myself I know how stressful uni can be so I know how important it is for students to know and feel that there is support available for them if and when they need it.

Tips: Look after yourself both physically and mentally, this is particularly important in the current times of Covid. You are more important than your degree, seriously you are! Make sure you take time to eat properly and healthy, relax, socialize, exercise and sleep.”


Joy Arthur

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Campus: Chelmsford
Course: Medicine
Nationality: English

“For me, being a Peer Wellbeing Mentor is great because I really enjoy getting to know and being able to help other students. Looking after your mental health is something which is so fundamental ,it is important to me that I can advocate this through the role.

Tips: Make time to do things which are completely unrelated to your studies - play sport, catch up with friends etc.”


Joyce Lievins

Joyce Lievins

Campus: Cambridge graduate
Course: Graduate of Film and Media Studies

“Being a Peer Wellbeing Mentor means offering my help and energy! I enjoy helping people and creating new activities for students to enjoy.

Tips: My tip for you is to believe in yourself! To know you can overcome anything you put your mind to. Always do you and stay true to who you are throughout your years in university.”


Kwaku Mncube

Kwaku Mncube

Campus: Chelmsford
Course: Quantity Surveying
Nationality: Ghanaian

“It’s important that you get to know us, the Peer Wellbeing Mentors, as we can help with problems. Also we are students just like you like, so we are likely to have some similar experiences in common.

Tips: My tips for wellbeing is establish routines, exercise and interact with others over problems you face. Also use the Fika app to help.”


Tina Curwen

Tina Curwen

Campus: Chelmsford
Course: Medicine
Nationality: English

“Being a Peer Wellbeing Mentor is a privilege, to have the opportunity to work with lots of students and meet people from all different backgrounds it great. I get to offer support to students which is very rewarding – especially when you see the positive impact it has.

Tips: Tips: Don’t suffer in silence and ask for help if you need it – There are lots of avenues of support available if you need it.”


Robert Hojda

Robert Hojda

Campus: Cambridge
Course: MSc Clinical Child Psychology
Nationality: Slovakia

“One of the best things students can get from knowing about us Peer Wellbeing Mentors is that there is always someone there for them in case they need it. Apart from that, we will help you get your queries with various services signposted and resolved.

Tips: Interact with each other. To get out of your rooms if you can. Be responsible in your studies, keep up your mental health by learning how to organise yourself, talking to your friends and family, opening up about your problems.”


Robinson Limbu

Robinson Limbu

Campus: Cambridge
Course: Biomedical Science
Nationality: Nepalese

“Being a Peer Mentor means I want to engage with you in any way I can by offering any help or service to you with regards to the city, the University and your mental health as well as fitness.

Tips: Use our FIKA app, where so many great advices and information are available for you to look after your well-being.”


Sara Hoxhaj

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Campus: Chelmsford
Course: Banking and Finance
Nationality: Albanian raised in Finland

“Being a peer wellbeing mentor provides us the opportunity to have someone hear out our troubles, support us through tough times and most importantly be there where things seem to get tough or difficult.

Tips: Know that through the right support and attitude most troubles that seem overwhelming and gigantic can be broken down and solved in simpler way, so reach out to services that are provided to you and trust that there are plenty of good people out there keen to help!”


Seyda Mahfuz

Seyda Mahfuz

Campus: Cambridge
Course: Law
Nationality: English/Bangladesh

“I am a huge advocate for mental health and self-care, it’s something which is very personal to me. This is why I became a Peer Wellbeing Mentor.

Tips: Take things slow, don’t be afraid to ask questions, just to also reassure you ARU has a wealth of resources to help maintain a positive well-being, so whenever in need reach out!”


Viktorija Blumberga

Viktorija Blumberga

Campus: Cambridge
Course: Business Management
Nationality: Latvian

“Being a Peer Wellbeing Mentor is a purpose. I felt like I was missing ARU go-to people when I first started; people who can signpost where I should go with my concerns and relate to the aspects of being a student. I am happy I can play this role for students!

Tips: I love to stick quotes everywhere so I will lead with a phrase which helps me to get through times of uncertainty and moments where life feels like a bumpy road: "May you always bounce on the trampoline of life!"”


 

More ways to look after yourself

Mental fitness

Maintain your mental fitness with the FIKA app and thrive at university.

Improve your mental fitness

6 Ways to Wellbeing

Follow the 6 Ways to Wellbeing and spend some positive time focusing on yourself.

Follow the 6 Ways to Wellbeing

Wellbeing workshops

Don’t wait until you’re experiencing hard times to come to our workshops. Come along now and understand how to manage your thoughts and feeling and succeed in your studies.

Find a wellbeing workshop for you

SilverCloud

Silvercloud is an online program to help you understand your experiences and improve your wellbeing.

See how Silvercloud can help you

Want to talk to someone?

The Counselling and Wellbeing Service is available to all students at ARU and offers a free and confidential service to promote mental health and wellbeing.

Cambridge: 01223 698276
Chelmsford: 01245 684271
Monday to Thursday: 9am–5pm
Friday: 9am–4.30pm

Need emergency help?

If you need emergency help, please take action straight away. If you’re worried about your safety, call 999 or take yourself to A&E.

Emergency help and crisis support