Medicine MBChB

Full-time undergraduate (5 years)

Chelmsford

September

Overview

Do you have the dream and the drive to become a doctor? Our Medicine degree leads to a Primary Medical Qualification that will allow you to register with the General Medical Council*. Study full-time over five years, and learn in our cutting-edge skill laboratories and cadaveric anatomy suite at the School of Medicine in Chelmsford. Placements start early, in primary and acute care settings, and in centres of excellence such as St Andrew’s Centre for Plastic Surgery and Burns and the Essex Cardiothoracic Centre. Build a bright future, for yourself and for your community.

Find out more about teaching options and studying during COVID-19 in the Entry requirements section, below.

Full description

Careers

When you graduate with your MBChB degree you’ll be able to apply for your 1st of two Foundation Years. Having studied with us you’ll be in a good position to apply to the Essex, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire (EBH) Foundation School. On successful completion of your Foundation Years you’ll be able to apply for further study within your chosen specialism. We envisage that our graduates will want to study further and work locally as there are many opportunities for training doctors within the region.

Curriculum

Core curriculum

  • About the core curriculum
    The core components of the curriculum represent the essential knowledge, skills and attitudes that you must acquire to practice as foundation doctors on graduation. The core curriculum has been designed to: ensure breadth of coverage; allow integration of basic and clinical sciences; align theory with practice; and to ensure you’ll have excellent opportunities to achieve the learning outcomes set by the General Medical Council.

The curriculum is divided into three phases, with core modules in each phase

  • Phase 1: Year 1
    Phase 1 runs over the first year of the course. It takes a systems-based approach, and is part of a fully integrated course that focuses on normal and abnormal structure, function and behaviour, basic and clinical sciences and hospital and community perspectives on health. The first year is made up of a period of systems-based teaching: after a basic ‘principles of medicine’ block you’ll cover the cardiovascular, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems The systems are taught in a way that integrate theoretical, practical and clinical aspects with lectures, laboratory work, small group work, clinical exposure and private study time. Phase 1 introduces you to the important fundamental principles that we’ll build upon as you progress through the course.
  • Year 1: MBChB
    Year 1 takes an organ system-based approach to the body, but the year is also fully integrated focusing on normal and abnormal structure, function and behaviour, basic and clinical sciences, and hospital and community perspectives on health. Problem-oriented learning, where learning is structured around examples of clinical problems, will be used wherever appropriate. Year 1 is comprised of the following: Principles block; Respiratory, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems blocks; Student selected component; Core clinical placements: GP and acute trusts. The aims of this year are to: introduce the biomedical-scientific principles underlying the practice of medicine; develop an understanding of normal and abnormal structure, function and behaviour of the various body systems; provide an introduction to clinical practice in both hospital and community settings; demonstrate how basic and clinical science integrates with clinical practice; instil the values of professionalism and enable development of students’ professional identities.
  • Phase 2: Years 2 and 3
    During this phase there are a further ten systems based blocks and you’ll begin the transition to the final clinical phase of the course. In the third year you’ll begin to consolidate your knowledge and focus on its application to the clinical setting via a series of rotational clinical experiences which occur in the second half of the year.
  • Year 2: MBChB
    Year 2 takes an organ system-based approach to the body, but the year is also fully integrated focusing on normal and abnormal structure, function and behaviour, basic and clinical sciences, and hospital and community perspectives on health. Problem-oriented learning, where learning is structured around examples of clinical problems, will be used wherever appropriate. Year 2 is comprised of the following: Systems: dermatology, musculoskeletal, endocrine, child and family, ENT, ophthalmology and renal; Student selected component; Core clinical placements: GP and acute trusts. The aims of this year are to: introduce the biomedical-scientific principles underlying the practice of medicine; develop an understanding of normal and abnormal structure, function and behaviour of the various body systems; provide an introduction to clinical practice in both hospital and community settings; demonstrate how basic and clinical science integrates with clinical practice.
  • Year 3: MBChB
    Year 3 takes an organ system-based approach to the body, but the year is also fully integrated focusing on normal and abnormal structure, function and behaviour, basic and clinical sciences, and hospital and community perspectives on health. Problem-oriented learning, where learning is structured around examples of clinical problems, will be used wherever appropriate. Year 3 is comprised of the following: Systems: neurology, psychiatry, reproductive and sexual health and haematology. Student selected component; Core clinical placements: GP and acute trusts. The aims of this year are to: continue the biomedical-scientific principles underlying the practice of medicine; develop an understanding of normal and abnormal structure, function and behaviour of the various body systems; provide an introduction to clinical practice in both hospital and community settings.
  • Phase 3: Years 4 and 5
    Phase 3 runs in Year 4 and Year 5. This phase of the course moves towards a case-based learning approach. A series of around 100 ‘core clinical problems’ will provide you with a framework to develop an integrated view of medicine. Phase 3 begins with a transition block, followed by a series of core specialty-based clinical placements and a final Preparation for Practice (PfP) placement. During the core clinical placements, you’ll organise your learning around the core clinical problems and observe these problems in different contexts and settings. The PfP teaching block allows you further development of experience, preparing you for your role as a junior doctor. You’ll undertake foundation assistantship teaching blocks in general practice, medicine and surgery.
  • Year 4: MBChB
    Year 4 (and 5, known as Phase 3) is based almost entirely on experiential learning in a ward or workplace setting and moves towards a task-based learning approach. In contrast to Systems in Practice, Year 4 is much more self-directed and less ‘pre-organised’. A series of around 100 ‘core clinical problems’ provide you with a framework for an integrated view of medicine. The year begins with a transition block, followed by a series of core clinical placements and includes Student Selected Components (SSCs). You’ll be expected to develop a wealth of clinical experience of patients and their problems, to master the competencies relating to the core clinical problems, and to learn to look at the patient as a whole rather than from the perspective of a disease entity. This strategy is aimed at enabling you to view patients’ concerns and problems as central to their practice. This year you’ll begin to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to fulfil the responsibilities of a Foundation Doctor; a sound professional attitude towards patients and colleagues and an understanding of the obligations of the medical profession.
  • Year 5: MBChB
    There’ll be a change of emphasis towards the end of Year 5 to the development of experience provided by a particular specialty, and final preparation for practice as a Foundation doctor. In contrast to Year 4, Year 5 focusses on the key skills required as a Foundation Doctor acquired through an apprenticeship model. A series of around 100 ‘core clinical problems’ provide you with a framework for an integrated view of medicine. You’ll maintain and further develop their achievement of the curriculum outcomes within a framework of Student Selected Components, Electives and Pre-registration (Foundation) Apprenticeship blocks: the former provide an opportunity for in-depth study in selected areas and the latter for integrating theory and practice in preparation for their Foundation appointments the following year. You’ll develop a wealth of clinical experience of patients and their problems, to master the competencies relating to the core clinical problems, and to learn to look at the patient as a whole rather than from the perspective of a disease entity. This strategy is aimed at enabling students to view patients’ concerns and problems as central to their practice. This year you’ll continue to enhance the knowledge and skills necessary to fulfil the responsibilities of a Foundation Doctor; and will develop the skills to have the ability to take responsibility for self-directed continuing medical education and lifelong learning.
  • Student Selected Components
    Throughout the three phases, you’ll have the opportunity to study areas of your choice, in depth through Student Selected Components (SSCs). The SSCs will enable you to develop generic skills that are essential to your professional development. In addition, through SSCs you can achieve transferable skills like information management, innovation, education, critical thinking and independent learning.
  • Longitudinal Themes
    Longitudinal themes are topics that are integrated across the five years of your course. They include elements of the basic sciences such as anatomy and physiology, through to areas of medical specialism which do not receive teaching blocks in their own right (public health, palliative care, microbiology) and also include areas that are covered repeatedly and are a requirement of all doctors such as professionalism, ethics, and evidence-based medicine.
  • Clinical Placements
    Clinical placements are a key part of your learning over the entire course, with patient and community-related activity starting early in your first year. In Phase 1 and 2, you’ll have several full-day sessions in primary care at general practices, which may include experiences in community and mental health providers, as well as weekly half-day sessions in secondary care in the Essex Acute Trusts. In Phase 3, your clinical placements become your dominant learning environment, where you’ll have patient contact in a variety of settings, including primary care, mental health and acute care. You’ll develop a wealth of clinical experience of patients and their problems and learn to look at the patient as a whole, enabling you to pursue a career in medicine where patients’ concerns and problems are central to your practice. You’ll also have the opportunity to undertake an elective placement in the UK or overseas.

Assessment

The aim of the course is to prepare you for clinical decision making and the capability to practice effectively as a doctor in a multi-professional team. You’ll be assessed by a combination of exams at the end of each year, and a portfolio of work that is completed throughout your course.

The exams will be in the form of Single Best Answers (SBA), Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) and anatomy spot examinations. At the end of the course you’ll be assessed by the national MLA (Medical Licensing Assessment).

In addition you’ll be required to undertake a Prescribing Safety Assessment.

Where you'll study

Your department and faculty

Train to become a doctor at Essex’s first School of Medicine. We offer an innovative, fully integrated curriculum with a strong science base - as well as excellent clinical opportunities to develop the skills and knowledge to work in, shape, and lead healthcare delivery in the 21st century.

Where can I study?

Chelmsford
Tindal Building on our Chelmsford campus

Our striking, modern campus sits by the riverside in Chelmsford's University and Innovation Quarter.

Explore our Chelmsford campus

Fees, scholarships and bursaries

Course fees

UK students starting 2021/22 (per year)

£9,250

Additional costs

  • Travel to placements (variable)
  • Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check
  • Lab coat
  • Protective eye wear
  • Stethoscope
  • Course books

*Fees and bursaries

The five-year Medicine degree course is offered on a self-funded basis with students paying the standard rate of tuition fees for the first four years. For UK students Year 5 is currently covered by an NHS bursary. Information on the funding arrangements for undergraduate medical courses can be found on the Health Education England website.

The Provide Anglia Ruskin School of Medicine Bursary

International applicants

We are currently unable to accept international applicants for this programme.

Entry requirements

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  • Grades AAA at A level taken within two academic years prior to the year of entry to include Chemistry or Biology; and one of either Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, plus one other.
  • 5 GCSEs at grade A*-B (9-6), including English Language, Maths and two science subjects.
  • A Level resit grades at AAA will be accepted within two academic years prior to the time of application (at first sitting applicants should have achieved AAB or BBB for a Widening Access to Medicine (WAMS) application).
  • UCAT (University Clinical Aptitude Test).
  • Successful Multiple Mini Interview.
  • If English is not your first language you will be expected to demonstrate a certificated level of proficiency of at least IELTS 7.5 (Academic level).
  • An Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check and satisfactory Occupational Health check.
  • You must be a minimum of 18 years of age by 1 November, in the year that you commence your course.

Main requirements

All applicants are considered on an individual basis.

A Levels

AAA at A Level taken within two academic years prior to the time of application, to include Chemistry or Biology and one of either Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics. For the third A Level*, please note that we do not accept General Studies and Critical Thinking. For Biology, Chemistry and Physics A Levels, we require a pass in the practical element. A Level resit grades at AAA will be accepted taken within two academic years prior to the time of application.

1st A Level

 

2nd A Level

 

3rd A Level

Biology

and

Chemistry or Physics or Maths

and

*Any

Chemistry

and

Biology or Physics or Maths

and

*Any

 

GCSEs

A minimum of 5 GCSEs at grade A*-B (9-6) required including English Language, Maths and two science subjects.

Scottish Qualifications

Advanced Highers: AAB from Scottish Advanced Highers with grades AA to come from Biology and/or Chemistry and another science subject. We will also require National 5 Grade B or above or GCSE in English Language and Maths.

Highers: AAAAA at Higher Grade including Biology and/or Chemistry and another science subject. We will also require National 5 Grade B or above or GCSE grade C (4) or above in English Language, two science subjects and Maths.

International Baccalaureate

A minimum of 36 points is accepted. 666 at Higher Level in Biology and/or Chemistry plus one other science and including Mathematics or English.

European Entry Requirements

For European entry requirements by country, please click here.

Cambridge Pre-U

D3, D3, D3 in Principal Subjects. Subjects should include Biology and/or Chemistry. If only one of Biology and/or Chemistry is offered, the other should be offered at A Level grade A (or Dual Award Science grade A).

IELTS

For applicants who do not have English as a first language, we require evidence of proficiency in English (including writing, speaking, listening and reading).

IELTS: 7.5 overall (minimum 7.0 in each component) taken within two academic years prior to the time of application.

Other qualifications

BTEC qualifications are not accepted. If you have qualifications that are not listed under the Main Academic Entry Requirements, please contact the Admissions Team.

Non-standard requirements

Access to Medicine

For applicants holding an Access to Higher Education Diploma (Medicine), 60 credits with a minimum of 45 credits at Level 3 of which at least 30 Level 3 credits must be at Distinction and, in addition 15 Level 3 credits must be at a minimum of Merit. The further 15 ungraded credits can be a combination of Level 2 and 3. Access qualifications should be awarded within two years prior to the year of entry applied for (eg 2020-2022 for 2022 entry). A minimum of 5 GCSE passes at grades A*-B (9-6) are also required including English Language, Maths and two science subjects.

We currently accept Access to Medicine qualifications from:

  • City & Islington College – Medicine and Medical Bio Sciences
  • College of West Anglia – Medicine and Dentistry
  • East Sussex College – Medicine
  • Harlow College – Medicine
  • Havering College – Medicine and Medical Sciences
  • Lambeth College – Medicine and Medical Biosciences
  • The Manchester College – Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Medical Science
  • Access to HE Diploma (Medicine and Healthcare Professionals) Newcastle and Stafford Colleges Group
  • Truro and Penwith College – Medicine
Graduates

There is no graduate entry programme. Applicants who have an undergraduate degree will start in Year 1 and will be required to complete all five years of the course. We recommend that applicants seek advice on funding prior to starting their application.

Minimum 2:1 honours degree awarded within the last five years. The degree must be in a biological, biomedical, chemistry or health science subject (please note we do not accept Nursing or Paramedic Science). All graduate applicants will need to provide their transcripts which will be evaluated and put to a panel decision, where factors mentioned in their personal statement, such as work experience in healthcare, will be considered. The minimum requirement for GCSEs will have to be met. The UCAT will also have to be completed by graduate applicants; GAMSAT will not be accepted.

Internal ARU Transfer Scheme

From September 2019, the School of Medicine will consider applications to transfer to the first year of our MBChB degree programme from students registered on the first year of our undergraduate programmes. Students may have the possibility of transferring to Medicine from the following courses:

  • BSc (Hons) Medical Science (Chelmsford campus)
  • BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science (Cambridge campus)
  • BOptom (Hons) Optometry (Cambridge campus)

Entry to the MBChB degree programme will be from September 2020 onwards. This is a highly competitive option and there is limited availability, so applicants must fulfil the same criteria as all other applicants to the course before being made an offer.

Find out more about our internal transfer scheme.

Widening Access to Medicine Scheme

We are committed to widening access and to recruiting students who have aspirations to study medicine but are from under-represented and/or disadvantaged groups. We aim to support applicants through the application and selection process and have a ’Widening Access to Medicine Scheme’ (WAMS). Depending on the circumstances, applicants eligible for this programme may be offered a lower conditional offer at A Level of ABB.

After we receive your UCAS application, we will send you a WAMS ‘Eligibility Questionnaire’. We will give you a deadline to complete and return the Questionnaire to the Admissions Team, otherwise we will assume that none of the information applies to you and you will not be considered for WAMS.

Download the WAMS questionnaire

East of England Region

We aspire to recruit promising and motivated students from the East of England region*. If your home address or school/college address is in the East of England region* up to one academic year prior to the time of your application, you will be allocated shortlisting points for the region and further points if the address is in Essex.

*Essex, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Norfolk, Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire and the North East London Boroughs.

Download the East Anglia Region map.

Download the North East London Boroughs map.

Non-academic entry requirements

Personal statement

While we do not directly use your personal statement in the selection process, you should be prepared to discuss or use aspects of your statement at the MMIs.

We will be looking to understand your motivation to study medicine, your appreciation of the role and responsibilities of being a doctor, as well as evidence of any work experience you have undertaken to support your application. From your personal statement, we’ll be looking for realistic expectations of what studying medicine entails and that you fully understand the high level of commitment involved. We want to see that you have researched all the aspects of the course and subsequent roles and have a clear view of where you intend the degree to take you.

We are adhering to the Medical Schools Council (MSC) ‘Selecting for Excellence’ recommendations. The MSC also provides guidance on the personal qualities which are desirable in a prospective student. We strongly recommend that you read these documents before making your application.

Work experience

It is desirable for applicants to have undertaken work experience in the healthcare sector, whether that be shadowing, volunteering, paid-work or observing. Clinical and non-clinical experience are important, which could be in a nursing home, nursery, charities, voluntary organisations, pharmacy as well as GP surgeries and hospitals. The purpose of the work experience is to give you an insight in to the working day of a healthcare professional, to challenge any preconceptions that you may have and give you a realistic view of the job roles you wish to pursue.

The Medical Schools Council (MSC) has guidance on work experience for applicants to medicine.

We will also consider other forms of work experience where you will have gained transferable skills such as communication, problem solving, care, working with others and professionalism.

University Clinical Aptitude Test (UCAT) previously known as UKCAT

All applicants are required to take the UCAT Medical Admissions Test in the summer prior to submitting their application, i.e. in July - October. See the UCAT website for full details of the test, timescales and the location of test centers. While we include the UCAT score within our selection process, we do not have a standard cut off value. Applicants will be ranked by their UCAT score and a certain number will be invited to an Interview Day, provided they meet our main academic entry requirements. Applicants with an SJT score of Band 4 (lowest band) will not be invited for interview for September 2019 entry onwards.

Please note that the UCAT score of those applicants invited to interview is expected to vary year on year, and as such, it is not possible to give applicants an indication of the score that is required to attend an Interview Day. Applicants in financial need may apply for a UCAT bursary to cover the full test fee. Please check the UCAT website for details.

When you apply to us, you will be asked to submit your UCAT number which we will use to verify your test result with UCAT. Please visit the UCAT website for test information.

Selection process

Our selection process is designed to identify students who have the academic ability and characteristics that would allow them to become excellent doctors. We expect applicants to be familiar with the NHS, NHS constitution and the General Medical Council (GMC) requirements of medical students. We will be looking for applicants to demonstrate throughout the process their professional attitude and commitment to the values of healthcare professionals.

Once you have submitted your UCAS form and are predicted to meet the main academic entry requirements, we will send you a WAMS Eligibility Questionnaire. You will need to complete and return the Questionnaire to the Admissions Team to be considered for WAMS.

Your UCAT Score will be ranked and shortlisting points allocated for living or studying up to one academic year prior to the time of your application in the East of England region, with further points for Essex. We will invite all the shortlisted applicants to interview.

Selection Process – 3 phases
  • Phase 1: Academic Screen
    All applications are checked to ensure that they meet the minimum academic entry requirements.

  • Phase 2: Shortlisting
    All applicants meeting the main academic entry requirements with predicted grades of AAA or WAMS applicants with a lower Conditional offer of ABB, will be ranked on their UCAT Score, with shortlisting points for living or studying in the East of England region, with further points for Essex.

  • Phase 3: Interviews (MMI)
    After the interview, applicants will receive the University's decision via UCAS. All offers will have conditions of satisfactory DBS and Occupational Health checks attached to them.

Interview Day

The Interview Day will consist of Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs), which are designed to gain further insight into your personal qualities and cognitive skills. They are comprised of a series of eight mini-interviews, each lasting seven minutes with a brief rest between each station. The interviews will consist of scenarios and tasks, which will be typically assessing:

  • Interpersonal and communication skills (including empathy)
  • Teamwork and leadership
  • Preparation and motivation
  • Critical thinking, problem solving
  • Ethical/moral reasoning
  • ‘Integrity’

The interviews will be carried out by members of the course team, healthcare professionals, junior doctors and service users. While we do not directly use your personal statement in the selection process, you should be prepared to discuss or use aspects of your statement.

Offers are based solely on MMI ranking, as all applicants who have reached this stage will be considered to be academically able to complete the course.

Age

Due to the early clinical contact in the first months of the course, students must be a minimum of 18 years of age by 1 November, in the year their course starts. Applicants who apply but would be under 18 by 1 November will be advised to reapply for the following year.

Applicants with learning support needs

We welcome all students. If you have study support needs, such as a specific learning difficulty, a medical condition or a disability, please do let us know. If you would like to discuss your requirements before an offer is made or would like to speak to a Study Support Adviser, please contact: studysupport@anglia.ac.uk. It helps to declare a learning support need as early as possible (on your UCAS application) so that support can be arranged. We seek to balance the requirements of both disability legislation and the General Medical Council’s Fitness to Practise policy. The School of Medicine will consider all requests for adjustments in line with the UK Equality Act 2010. Any such requests are considered separately from decisions to offer places. Places are offered solely on MMI ranking following interview.

Professional behaviour and Fitness to Practise: Conditions of any offer made

You must be able to fulfil the duties of a doctor as stated by the General Medical Council in their document Good Medical Practice. Registration on the course is conditional on satisfactory occupational health and Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks. We will also verify all applicant details against the Medical Schools Council database to ensure no Fitness to Practise findings have been registered against an applicant.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS)

An Enhanced DBS check is a compulsory requirement of any offer to study on courses which requires you to be on placement and work with children and/or vulnerable adults. This check will confirm whether you have any criminal convictions, cautions or reprimands registered against you, and is necessary to protect both you and the public against people who are unsuitable to work with children and/or vulnerable adults.

The Admissions Team will send you the necessary paperwork to complete and you will be asked to return the completed forms when invited to attend the Interview Day. Please note that you will need to meet the cost of the check yourself, currently £44 (2018 fee).

Offers for international applicants will be confirmed on the basis of a letter from either the British High Commission of their local constabulary, confirming that they have no criminal convictions and are of good character. Successful applicants will complete and submit their Enhanced DBS application as soon as a UK address is secured and will not be permitted to attend placement until a satisfactory DBS Disclosure certificate is received and verified.

More information on the DBS check can be found here.

Further details on DBS disclosures can be found on the Gov.UK website, by contacting the DBS information line on 0870 9090 844 or by contacting Anglia Ruskin University's DBS Officers on 01245 68 4984 or DBSOfficer@anglia.ac.uk.

Occupational Health

The purpose of Occupational Health checks is to ensure that successful applicants are fit to undertake the course requirements effectively and without risk to themselves or others. Course places at the School of Medicine are offered subject to a satisfactory health check. The Admissions Team will send paperwork to complete and successful applicants will be assessed individually. If you don't have a completed occupational health check, this could delay you starting the course.


Please visit the General Medical Council (GMC) website for their guidelines on outcomes for graduates.

Due to the national lockdown all universities in England, including ARU, are only able to provide face to face teaching on campus for a limited number of courses.

Teaching options when not in a lockdown

In response to the COVID-19 global pandemic all our students can choose to either study face to face on campus or online only, and students are able to change their mode of delivery at given dates throughout the trimester.

For on-campus teaching, we offer at least four hours face-to-face teaching related contact time per week for our undergraduate full-time courses, supported by online learning using our established online learning systems. The number of contact hours vary course by course, and you can contact us for further information. The provision offered is subject to change due to the possibility of further Government restrictions, however we remain committed to delivering face-to-face teaching and ensuring a COVID-19 secure environment.

In the event that there are further changes to the current restrictions that are in place due to the pandemic, we may need to move some courses online only at short notice to remain in line with Government guidelines and ensure the continued safety of our students and staff.

National lockdown (from 5 January 2021) 

View the impact of the current restrictions

International applicants

We are currently unable to accept international applicants for this programme.

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