Dr Annelie Harvey

Associate Professor; Deputy Head of School

Faculty:Faculty of Science and Engineering

School:Psychology and Sport Science

Location: Cambridge

Areas of Expertise: Societies and Groups

Annelie is a social psychologist interested in the psychology of justice. Her research considers how people react to victims and instances of misfortune.

annelie.harvey@aru.ac.uk

Twitter: @annelieharvey

View Annelie's ResearchGate profile

Background

Annelie joined Anglia Ruskin University in 2015 following completion of her PhD at the University of Essex.

Annelie's research is inspired by the 'Belief in a Just World' theory, which posits that people have an inherent motivation to believe that the world is a fair and just place where everyone gets what they deserve. Although such a belief sounds unrealistic, it is essentially what drives people to delay gratification and work towards their deserved outcomes in life. Being confronted with instances of undeserved suffering and misfortune threaten this belief, and therefore, people react in a number of ways to make sense of victimisation and injustice.

Annelie's work considers the different reactions people exhibit and how these reactions operate. For example, she has investigated the level of processing that reactions to victims operate at (Harvey, Callan & Matthews, 2014), how different types of justice reasoning are moderated by religiosity (Harvey and Callan, 2014) and more recently, if people are biased in perceiving just-world consistent information (Harvey et al., 2017).

Research interests

  • Reactions to injustice
  • Reactions to victims
  • Victims and stereotypes

Find out more about our Psychology PhD.

Teaching

Social Psychology, Forensic Psychology

Qualifications

  • PhD, Psychology, University of Essex: October, 2014.
  • Title: Making sense of victimisation and misfortunes: a just-world theory perspective

  • MSc, Research Methods in Psychology, University of Essex, 2011 (Distinction).
  • Dissertation: Footballers’ wives, skinheads and teenage mothers: procedural and behavioural rebound of stereotypes

  • BSc (Hons), Psychology, University of Essex, 2010 (First class)
  • Anglia Ruskin University Teaching Fellow. Anglia Ruskin University: 2019
  • Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Anglia Ruskin University: 2016
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education. Anglia Ruskin University: 2016

Research grants, consultancy, knowledge exchange

Keyes, H. K., Harvey, A. J., & Lee, E. (2019). Expecting better: Effectively conveying time allocation expectations to students. Anglia Ruskin Learning and Teaching Project Award: £3,470

Callan, M. J., Harvey, A. J., & Olson, J. M. (2016-2018). Rejecting Innocent Victims: The Roles of Relative Judgments and Emotional Impact. The Leverhulme Trust: £103,128

Keyes, H. K., & Harvey, A. J. (2017-2018). How do I compare thee? An evidence-based approach to the presentation of class comparison information to students using Dashboard. Anglia Ruskin Learning and Teaching Project Award: £3,292

Zawisza, M., Harvey, A. J., Hina, F., Gradidge, S. (2018). Improving Public Confidence in Essex Police through Social Media Communications. REF Impact Fund: £4,000

Selected recent publications

Harvey, A. J., Blackie, L. E. R. (accepted). Are predictions and perceptions of post-traumatic growth a form of ultimate justice reasoning? European Journal of Personality.

Dawtry, R. J., Callan, M. J., Harvey, A. J., Gheorghiu, A., 2020. Victims, vignettes, and videos: The effect of emotional impact on the derogation of innocent victims. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 24, pp. 233-259. doi: 10.1177/1088868320914208

Harvey, A. J., Keyes, H., 2019. How do I compare thee? An evidence-based approach to the presentation of class comparison information to students using Dashboard. Innovations in Education and Teaching International. doi: 10.1080/14703297.2019.1593213

Dawtry, R. J., Callan, M. J., Harvey, A. J., Olson, J. M., 2018) Derogating innocent victims: The effects of Relative versus absolute character judgments. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 44, pp. 186-199.

Harvey, A. J., Callan, M. J., Sutton, R. M., Foulsham, T., Matthews, W. J., 2017. Selective exposure to deserved outcomes. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 69, pp. 33-43.

Ellard, J., Harvey, A. J., Callan, M. J., 2016. The Justice Motive. In Sabbagh, C., Schmitt, M. (eds.), 2016. Handbook of Social Justice Theory and Research (New York: Springer).

Harvey, A. J., Callan, M. J., 2014. Getting “just desserts” or seeing the “silver lining”: The relation between judgments of immanent and ultimate justice. PLoS ONE, 9, e101803. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.010180

Harvey, A. J., Callan, M. J., & Matthews, W. J., 2014. How much does effortful thinking underlie observers’ reactions to victimization? Social Justice Research, 27, pp. 175–208.

Callan, M. J., Sutton, R. M., Harvey, A. J., Dawtry, R. J., 2014. Immanent justice reasoning: Theory, research, and current directions. In Olson, J. M., Zanna, M. P. (eds.), 2014. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (London: Academic Press), Vol. 49, pp. 105–161.

Callan, M. J., Harvey, A. J., Sutton, R. M., 2014. Rejecting victims of misfortune reduces delay discounting. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 51, pp. 41–44.

Harvey, A. J., Callan, M. J., 2014. The role of religiosity in ultimate and immanent justice reasoning. Personality and Individual Differences, 56, pp. 193–196.

Callan, M. J., Harvey, A. J., Dawtry, R. J., Sutton, R. M., 2013. Through the looking glass: Long-term goal focus increases immanent justice reasoning. British Journal of Social Psychology, 52, 377–385.

Recent presentations and conferences

Harvey, A. J., (2019, September) Easy Reading Reading Lists: Creating Manageable @Anglia Reading Lists for Students. Talk delivered as part of the Digifest Conference, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK.

Harvey, A. J., (2019, September). Post-Traumatic Growth as Maintain a Belief in a Just World. Invited talk delivered as part of the European Association of Personality Psychology Sponsored Expert Meeting, Nottingham, UK.

Harvey, A. J., (2019, February). Why do we Blame Victims? Talk as part of the Mind/Body Matters research series, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.

Dawtry, R. J., Callan, M. J., Harvey, A. J. & Gheorghiu, A. (2019, January). Victims, Vignettes and Video Tapes: A Meta-Analysis of Experimental Research on Victim Derogation from Lerner & Simmons (1966) to Present. Poster presented at the FST Research Conference, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.

Harvey, A. J., (2018, November). Making Sense of Victimisation and Misfortune: A Just World Theory Perspective. Invited talk at the University of Suffolk, Ipswich, UK.

Harvey, A. J., & Keyes, H. (2018, June). How do I compare thee? An evidence-based approach to the presentation of class comparison information to students using Dashboard. Paper presented as part of the LTA Conference, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford UK.

Dawtry, R. J., Callan, M. J., & Harvey, A. J. (2018, March). Victims, Vignettes and Video Tapes: A Meta-Analysis of Experimental Research on Victim Derogation from Lerner & Simmons (1966) to Present. Poster presented at the annual convention of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Harvey, A. J., Callan, M. J., & Sutton, R. M. (2016, July). Getting your “just deserts”: When justice affirmation reduces immanent justice reasoning and biased information search. Paper presented as part of a symposium entitled "Forces of justice. Why we need to distinguish beliefs in human, natural and supernatural sources of justice" at the 16th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Justice Research, Canterbury, UK.

Harvey, A. J., Callan, M. J., & Sutton, R. M. (2016, July). When justice affirmation reduces immanent justice reasoning and biased information search. Poster presented as part of the FSE Research Conference, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford UK.