5 Ways to keep motivated when studying Medicine

Fatima

Faculty: Health, Education, Medicine and Social Care
School: School of Medicine
Course: MBChB Medicine
Category: Medicine

5 January 2023

Winter is that time of year when things seem to slow down almost to a grinding halt. I think it can be one of the hardest times of the year to keep motivated. If you are a summer lover like me then the cold, grey and wet days can take their toll. Here are some of the ways that I keep myself motivated when studying and revision become an uphill battle.

  1. Watching documentaries on areas of medicine you are interested in: When I struggle to revise, I know I need to take a break from the books and remember why I'm studying Medicine. During these times I like to watch a documentary on a speciality I'm interested in. Lennox Hill on Netflix is a great show, and seeing the doctors navigate through their careers and talk about their experiences, really helps boost my motivation.
  2. Listening to a podcast: This is another great way to change up revision routine. I particularly enjoy the Zero to Finals Podcast to catch any gaps in my general knowledge/understanding of a topic. 
  3. Social Media: A lot of insights are shared by fellow students around the world via platforms such as TikTok, Instagram and YouTube. This can really boost motivation especially when you see people in the academic years above you start placement, electives or present in conferences and providing advice and insight on how it is going and tips on achieving good results. 
  4. Using an app to map out your daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly goals: I personally enjoy using Notion so that I can visualise my goals, both short-term and long-term throughout the year. Writing down where I want to be next year and what I want to achieve is a helpful reminder for me when I'm lacking motivation. Having daily/weekly goals also helps break it down into smaller, achievable targets.
  5. Mentoring: This is something that not only helps with motivation but also really helps enhance your CV and make you a stronger candidate for future job roles. It's also fulfilling and satisfying to be part of someone's journey to Medicine. Although not strictly academic, it's a useful skill to be able to help guide others and give advice, and 100% transfers to a career in medicine. 

Disclaimer

The views expressed here are those of the individual and do not necessarily represent the views of Anglia Ruskin University. If you've got any concerns please contact us.