Business with Tourism* BSc (Hons)

Full-time undergraduate (2 years, 3 years, 4 years with foundation year, 4 years with placement)

Cambridge

September

*Subject to validation.


This course is available as a 2 year accelerated degree, 3 year degree, a 4 year degree with placement, or a 4 year extended degree.

Overview

You’re looking for a course that excites and interests you. But it needs to enhance your employment prospects too. Our full-time Business with Tourism degree will do just that. Study in Cambridge, a top tourist destination, and learn on the ground – getting involved in local projects and building up your experience. You’ll graduate with practical skills, a sound knowledge of the tourism industry, the ability to adapt to trends, and industry contacts that will benefit you throughout your career.

Full description

Careers

We work with employers to make sure you graduate with the knowledge, skills and abilities they need. They help us review what we teach and how we teach it – and they offer hands-on, practical opportunities to learn through work-based projects, internships or placements.

Tourism graduates can follow careers in environmental or events planning, outdoor leisure management, destination marketing, consultancy, leisure promotion, tourism analysis – or the wider field of business management. It’s possible to focus on a particular area of interest and embark on a career in a specific sector of the industry.

Throughout our BSc (Hons) Business with Tourism course, you’ll benefit from lectures and seminars on career-relevant issues, such as CV preparation, job-hunting, obtaining work experience and using social media.

Our dedicated placements and employability support team can help you access information that’s directly relevant to tourism graduates. You’ll be encouraged to reflect on your strengths and areas for development, and to make plans to enhance your skills and experience in preparation for employment.

We host employer visits and business events, and invite guest speakers from the business travel sector to share up to date information and discuss work practices. It’s a chance to enhance your knowledge of the job market and network with employers.

Through our Business School Intern programme, around 35 students each year get a business mentor, work experience, exclusive training and development, and a reference from our Dean.

Modules & assessment

Level 4 modules

  • Introduction to Business - Financial Analysis and Management
    Finance and business information is the lifeblood of any organisations operations and decisions. You’ll work with data and case studies from organisations, meet with businesses to understand the practical use this key information is put to and present your decisions on a going concern or start-up. As you present your analysis of key information and conclusions to other stakeholders, you'll develop your persuasion and negotiation skills.
  • Global Business Environment and International Strategy
    You'll explore the factors that affect business, from a mostly external perspective, including elements of globalisation and international business and the fundamental skills needed in the world of business. Political, Economics, Social, Legal, Ecological and Technological factors will be examined in the macro business environment and how these interact in a competitive environment with globalisation, technological and social change to create complex strategic options for organisations. You will also explore in some detail the concept of sustainability and introductory economics.
  • Working Cross Functionally - Human Resources and Marketing
    HR and Marketing are 2 key functional areas in an organisation that can work together to effectively solve business critical issues relating to organisational behaviour. You’ll develop the ability to analyse the human side of management and diagnose problems affecting performance, effectiveness, reputation and customer satisfaction. We'll provide a foundation of core theories and models for organisational behaviour and marketing management and the challenges that could be solved by successful cross-functional collaboration. These collaborations might include employer branding strategies, internal marketing, organisational change programmes and culture audits. By exploring the market position of example organisations, their internal and external communications to employees, customers and other stakeholders you'll develop collaborative cross-functional solutions to real-life problems. You'll be supporting your employability skills, such as critical analysis, organisational culture and visual identity, by outlining the types of work undertaken to support strategic organisational issues or problems.
  • The Entrepreneurial Journey
    Entrepreneurs are people who identify and exploit opportunities for new products, marketing or processes to generate economic and social value. Entrepreneurship is not just about new venture creation, it involves using creative or innovative ideas to recognise and develop solutions. You’ll work as part of a team over 3 rounds of activity (such as gamification, experiential learning and simulation) to focus on the identification of an opportunity, the creation of a product or service and pitching a concept to work as part of the team to develop your skills and collaborate with organisations and guest speakers.
  • Business Law
    As an introduction to a broad range of civil legal issues, you'll get an insight and appreciation of the various ways in which the law impacts on the domestic and international business environment. The module provides a foundation across a broad range of legal issues, focusing on the nature and sources of business law, on contract law with regard to both goods and services and on the law of tort, in particular, negligence and vicarious liability and how these permeate into everyday life. There’ll also be a brief focus on the type of corporate structures and employment relationships that exist in the UK.

Level 5 modules

  • E-Business Management
    Developing appropriate strategies to harness real business intelligence and value from information remains high on the strategic agenda. E-Business is essential for managing interfaces with customers, building relationships and creating loyalty, so you’ll look at different e-business options and the models available for businesses to exploit, taking in the whole business and global engagements. As well as looking at enterprise systems on the supply side, looking at how E-Business can assist the management of the supply network, you'll also focus on design and implementation issues to ensure information and strategies are designed to suit the organisation and their competitive environment, the systems development approaches and methods available and methods available including prototyping and the option to outsource.
  • Project Management and Implementation
    Project management is a key skill for any future professional. This module focuses on providing a sound basis for managing or working on projects. In essence, the concept of managing a project hinging on one quite basic principle, managing the triangle of: quality of the project outcomes, cost and time. The module covers: Project Management Body of Knowledge; the importance of stakeholder and risk management; scheduling and costing; monitoring and controlling techniques, time management and resource optimisation; improving the success of projects; and the principles of agile project management.
  • Principles of Tourism
    You'll be introduced to the main theoretical concepts underpinning tourism and events studies today, along with some of the issues that affect tourism destinations, industries (such as the events industry) and tourists themselves. Challenging the conventional foundations of modern mass tourism, the travel market has expanded its demands to reflect growing concerns about the overall performance of the tourism sector. You'll cover historical changes in leisure and development of tourism in specific destination localities and the wider world through case studies. We'll also focus on the development of mass package tourism, where it takes place and why; what are the social, economic, and environmental consequences of these developments in particular places. We will also examine the increasing globalization of the world economy and the role of tourism, and events on particular topics such as the geographies of food, notions of mobilities that breakdown the separation of everyday travel and tourist travel. This module will consider the rise of special interest travel, from ecotourism to dark tourism, and of course the events sector, with a specific case study of the events sector, and the organisations involved in its operation. We'll introduce the theory of tourism study which considers both the destination (tourism) and market (tourist) characteristics of the sector. A variety of models have been developed to help us understand the main issues and debates surrounding tourism development and management. Examples of these include the Destination Life Cycle and Irridex models, simple illustrations of tourism dynamics. These types of models will be introduced and developed throughout the modular programme.
  • Heritage Cultural and Gastronomy Tourism
    How lucky we are to have beautiful and historic Cambridge as our classroom! This module takes full advantage of our campus base to learn about tourism in different contexts: from heritage and visitor experiences, cultural hot spots such as Europe’s first eco-mosque for 1,000 worshippers in Mill Road, and food and drink tourism from pop-ups to festivals. With field trips to put your learning in practice. From a visitors perspective you'll look at different heritage and cultural tourism sectors, flows, and clusters on both a local and global scale, elaborating on how notions of culture and heritage are made, interpreted, managed, and used. Key concepts such as culture, heritage (in its various forms: tangible and intangible; cultural; natural; personal; etc.), cosmopolitanism, interpretation, identity and dissonance, are defined, illustrated and discussed, through relevant case studies, examples, and field trips. Food and drink tourism represents a form of special interest tourism that throws light on how culinary artefacts and their history link with a place, identity and culture. Dark tourism and slum tourism are more controversially discussed new forms of cultural tourism given their focus on human tragedy, and disasters as main attractions and will be examined in terms of the form they take and the concerns raised by ethical issues. Case studies will be drawn from research in urban and non-urban contexts; however, particular attention will be paid to cultural and heritage tourism in cities. Destinations have increasingly given attention to the role of food and drinks as part of their local intangible heritage. These have been integrated into an original and innovative destination marketing strategy that focuses on trails and festivals to respond to a desire for ‘local’ authentic (food) experiences. Therefore, we'll place special emphasis on food and drink tourism which has been recognised as a powerful vehicle for behavioural and attitudinal change, specifically with regard to sustaining rural businesses and communities. Finally, you'll also consider a demand-related perspective on heritage tourism by presenting different forms of heritage interpretation and the use of new technologies in interpreting cultural heritage in attempt for audience development, visitor involvement, and the stimulation of visits. The module will be interactive and will draw on a wide and illuminating variety of illustrative case studies from around the world. Supported by research and critical theory, you'll combine a research-informed approach with real-life case studies and field trips to reveal the broad range of cultural and heritage tourism.

Placement year (Optional)

  • Work Placement - Marketing, Enterprise and Tourism
    In a competitive job market, understanding how the professional work place functions, along with well-developed employability skills, are key to a graduate securing employment. The work placement gives you the opportunity to put into practice what would have been learned in the first two years and to enter their final year with the insights of their practical experience in the field. During this module you will undertake a work-based learning internship with a company or organisation where they will be supported in developing effective professional practices through guidance in generic and specific employability skills and through developing independent reflective learning practices to enhance your continuing professional development in the context of your own working environment. The module aims to provide you with experience of work in a business environment including familiarisation with a professional work environment. The module will be underpinned by employability skills training, reflective assessment and support from academic tutors. You will expected to be able to reflect on your experience in writing and orally, and demonstrate how you have applied theory, and learnings to date within a work-based environment. The assessment aims to support and develop your ability to demonstrate your professionalism, leadership and managerial skills to a prospective employer whilst also learning key communication and personal skills. - You must secure a placement, or placements (maximum 3) amounting to 9 months duration with minimum term of 3 months per placement. - Placement can start at any point from 1 June and must have started by 1 October.

Level 6 modules

  • Strategic Management
    Strategic Management is a fascinating discipline that studies the long-term purpose and direction of organisations, by looking at how to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. You'll explore core frameworks and analytical techniques that will enable you to assess the resources and capabilities of organisations in relation to the conditions of the industry, macro environment and stakeholder pressures. Your focus then turns to strategic implementation, specifically in relation to business-level and corporate-level strategies. This is organised around five thematic areas: the evaluation of strategic options in terms of suitability, acceptability and feasibility; 'intended strategy development' versus 'emergent strategy development'; the role of organisational structures and systems in strategy development; leadership of strategic change; and finally the practice of strategy: who is involved in strategy development, the types of activities in which strategists are involved, and the types of methodologies that strategists use. With a practical and problem-oriented focus, the emphasis is on application of concepts and frameworks, helping you to analyse and gain insight into strategic challenges faced by an organisation. Throughout the learning period, you'll reflect on the global nature of competition, how strategic management can contribute to the creation of shared value and business sustainability.
  • Sustainability and Responsible Business
    You'll develop understanding of the shift towards more environmentally, socially and economically responsible business practice and in particular focus on the drivers behind this shift; including an understanding of the sustainable development goals and growing business arguments for including a consideration of sustainability in all business and management practice. The module promotes a personal approach to the issues of sustainability and personal and social responsibility. The module includes an authentic assessment where you'll be diagnosing, designing and evaluating an environmental management plan for your households or organisations, while reflecting on your personal responsibility and ethical behaviour. You'll pay special attention to questioning the different responses of business in relation to social responsibility and sustainable management. If you're studying BSc (Hons) Business Management, successful completion of this module provides exemption against the Chartered Management Institute’s (CMI) unit 5022V1 Organisational Corporate Social Responsibility.
  • Sustainable Tourism Management
    Tourism is an attractive form of development for many countries, though in many cases there is an undue focus on international tourism, often to the detriment of a focus on domestic tourism. Yet, all tourism has negative and positive aspects to it. Tourism involves not only inflows of foreign financial resources but also outflows (leakages), which can significantly neutralize the positive financial effects of international tourism. We will critically review the social and economic consequences of certain forms of tourism, looking at how ecotourism; nature-based and wildlife tourism; events tourism; volunteer tourism; and approaches such as pro-poor tourism are seeking to bring more widespread social, economic and environmental benefits. There is a particular focus on the benefits to local people, including the poorest groups of people in tourism destinations. You'll examine the regional, national, and international frameworks in which the tourism industry operates to identify some of the main alternative options and strategies for tourism development examining the economic, cultural and environmental potentials, determinants, and constraints. The module uses in-depth case studies to discuss the dichotomy between sustainability-led strategies in mass tourism and the implementation of sustainability as a niche tourism strategy including market interventions such as 'pro-poor tourism'. The module examines the roles of differing agents in tourism development e.g. how governments may be constrained by a range of international factors in seeking to develop tourism, such as a need for foreign revenue, and thus may have little negotiating influence with multinational tourism organisations. The module is strongly grounded in the notions of sustainability, ethics and responsibility and the extent to which these are integrated into the development, management and innovations in the tourism sector globally and locally.
  • Undergraduate Major Project
    Undertaking a Major Project allows you to engage in a substantial piece of individual research, and/or product development work, on a selected topic within the broad business and management field, relating to your particular interests and background, although closely linked to our wide range of staff interests and research. You will have many group sessions to support your project, plus the supervision by an academic member of staff. The project also encourages students to share ideas and approaches. The chosen topic will be in your course subject area and require you to identify/formulate problems and issues based on a range of topics provided by conducting a literature review and evaluating information. You will investigate and adopt a suitable desk based methodology and determine solutions, perhaps developing hardware, software and/or media artefacts as appropriate. You will critically appraise and present your findings, reflecting upon the limitations of your research and the research process.

Assessment

You can expect an interesting mix of coursework, essays, exams and activity-based assignments. Your coursework could include problem-solving activities, consultancy projects, presentations and group or individual reports. You'll also be able to access support materials through our learning management system (Canvas).

All assessment is designed to allow you to demonstrate what you’ve learned from modules, and to make sure you’re developing the knowledge and skills you need to successfully complete the course.

 

This is a 2 year, 3 year or 4 year programme

Please note that modules are subject to change and availability.

 

Where you'll study

Your faculty

You have a highly active mind and see opportunity everywhere. Now you need theory and life-changing skills to sharpen your approach to management. At the Faculty of Business & Law, you will immerse yourself in a multicultural environment where technology blends with teaching to create a dynamic and innovative learning environment. An environment to help you gain those skills.

Where can I study?

Cambridge
Lord Ashcroft Building on our Cambridge campus

Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

Explore our Cambridge campus

Placement year

We want to make sure that you’re fully prepared for an increasingly competitive job market, so we offer a four-year degree option which includes a work placement in the third year. It’s an opportunity to apply and enhance your skills while developing new ones. You’ll also build valuable professional networks.

It could be that you have one placement during Year 3, or you could have two or three, giving you the chance to experience different organisations and working practices. Many of our students find that their placement company hires them when they graduate. We have a specialist team to help you find a placement and support you during this year. You might work in the UK or go abroad: our students have worked at leading organisations such as PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC), Bosch, BMW, Airbus, BskyB and KPMG. This period of work experience can help set your final-year studies in context and may well help with your dissertation topic. All in all, it’s a fantastic way to stay ahead of the competition.

Studying abroad

You could broaden your horizons by spending time living and studying abroad. This could be a short study visit or a semester spent in Europe, Canada, the USA or Malaysia. It will look great on your CV and help you take advantage of opportunities in the international job market.

Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students starting 2020/21 (per year)

£9,250

International students starting 2020/21 (per year)

£13,500

Placement year (UK, EU, international students)

£1,250

Fee information

For more information about tuition fees, including the UK Government's commitment to EU students, please see our UK/EU funding pages

Year 2 Field Trip

In the second year students visit Barcelona. The Faculty pays for accommodation but students are required to pay for flights, these may cost up to £500.  

How do I pay my fees?

Tuition fee loan

You can take out a tuition fee loan, which you won’t need to start repaying until after your graduate. Or alternatively, there's the option to pay your fees upfront.

Loans and fee payments

Scholarships

We offer a fantastic range of ARU scholarships, which provide extra financial support while you’re at university. Some of these cover all or part of your tuition fees.

Explore ARU scholarships

International students

You must pay your fees upfront, in full or in instalments. We will also ask you for a deposit or sponsorship letter. Details will be in your offer letter.

Paying your fees

Funding for UK & EU students

Most new undergraduate students can apply for government funding to support their studies and university life. This includes Tuition Fee Loans and Maintenance Loans. There are additional grants available for specific groups of students, such as those with disabilities or dependants.

We also offer a fantastic range of ARU scholarships, which provide extra financial support while you’re at university. Find out more about eligibility and how to apply.

Funding for international students

We offer a number of scholarships, as well as an early payment discount. Explore your options:

Entry requirements

Loading... Entry requirements are not currently available, please try again later.

Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

We don't accept AS level qualifications on their own for entry to our undergraduate degree courses. However for some degree courses a small number of tariff points from AS levels are accepted as long as they're combined with tariff points from A levels or other equivalent level 3 qualifications in other subjects.

International students

We welcome applications from international and EU students, and accept a range of international qualifications.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you'll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for postgraduate courses.

Improving your English language skills

If you don't meet our English language requirements, we offer a range of courses which could help you achieve the level required for entry onto a degree course.

We also provide our own English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT) in the UK and overseas. To find out if we are planning to hold an ELPT in your country, contact our country managers.

Similar courses that may interest you

Business with Events*

Full-time, full-time with placement undergraduate (2 years, 3 years, 4 years with foundation year, 4 years with placement)

Cambridge

September

Business and Tourism Management

Full-time undergraduate (3 years)

ARU London

September, January

International Business Management

Full-time, full-time with placement undergraduate (2 years, 3 years, 4 years with foundation year, 4 years with placement)

Cambridge

September

Apply now

UK and EU students

Apply through UCAS

UCAScode: N801, N803

Apply via UCAS

International students

Applicants from outside the UK and EU, apply to ARU

Apply direct

Get more information

UK & EU applicants

01245 68 68 68

Enquire online

International applicants

+44 1245 68 68 68

Enquire online