Brexit: information for students, staff and research partners

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This page was last updated on 16 May 2019

The UK is due to leave the European Union, which is likely to lead to changes to the system for EU, EEA and Swiss students coming to the UK to study. It may also have an impact on future research projects and collaboration.

The situation will be different depending on whether the UK leaves the EU with a deal (withdrawal agreement) or without a deal (no deal).

The European Union has granted the UK a six-month extension to Brexit, making the new deadline 31 October 2019.

Here at ARU, we recognise that EU, EEA and Swiss students, staff, projects, partnerships and relationships are a key part of our future.

Our diversity and inclusivity makes us what we are. We value the academic and cultural richness that students and colleagues from a wide range of countries bring to our community.

We will continue to welcome all who want to study or work with us.

New students

We know that EU, EEA and Swiss students who want to study in the UK may be concerned about issues such as fees and immigration. We look at this in more detail below, but we can assure you that:

  1. there are no changes to fee eligibility for EU students if you start a course in the 2019/20 academic year
  2. you can still apply for student loans, and a range of ARU scholarships
  3. EU undergraduate students will continue to be eligible for our EU Undergraduate Bursary
  4. assuming the UK leaves the EU with a deal, there is no immediate change to your immigration status.

Applicants and offer holders

If you’ve already applied to ARU and are due to start a course in 2019/20, there are no changes to your offer. It is still valid.

We also welcome new applications from students in the EU and around the world – whether you’re interested in an undergraduate, postgraduate or research degree. You may notice some changes to the rules around visas and immigration – and, to a lesser extent, fees and funding. These are detailed below.

Visas and immigration

If the UK leaves with a withdrawal agreement, you will not need a visa if you arrive in the UK before 1 January 2021. You, and any eligible family members who are living in the UK, will be able to apply for settlement if you wish. It's free to apply.

The rules change from 1 January 2021. All EU and EEA students arriving on or after this date will need to apply for a student visa. For more information about visas and immigration visit the Gov.UK website.

If the UK leaves with no deal, you should apply for a European Temporary Leave to Remain. This lets you stay in the UK to live, work and study for three years. If you’d like to stay in the UK after those three years, you can apply for a visa under a new immigration system.

This information doesn't apply to Irish citizens: you will have the right to enter and live in the UK under Common Travel Area Arrangements.

Fees, loans and studentships

If you're an EU student starting a course in the 2019/20 academic year, your fees will remain the same as those of UK students for the duration of your course.

You will still be able to apply for student loans and grants. This includes the Tuition Fee Loan for undergraduate students, the Postgraduate Loan and the Doctoral (or PhD) Loan. We also offer a range of ARU scholarships.

This advice applies whether the UK leaves the EU with or without a deal.

Research students from the EU who are starting a programme in 2019/20 will still be able to apply for UK Research Council studentships – as well as our own Vice Chancellor’s PhD Studentships. Universities are seeking assurances that this will remain the case, whether the UK leaves the EU with or without a deal.

The fee status of EU and EEA students starting courses at UK universities from 2020–21 has not yet been determined.

Working while studying

It is not immediately clear how Brexit may affect EU students who want to work while studying.

The rules will be mapped out as part of the UK's withdrawal agreement. We anticipate that there will be working restrictions after 31 December 2020, but do not yet know what these might be. Until 31 December 2020, EU, EEA and Swiss citizens will be free to work in the UK as they do now.

If you wish to remain in the UK after December 2020, you can apply to stay under the settlement scheme. This is open now for students.

If there is no deal, applying for a European Temporary Leave to Remain will give you the right to work in the UK as a student.

Irish citizens' rights to live and work in the UK will not change.

Health and medical care

The UK Government has confirmed that NHS healthcare will be available to EU, EEA and Swiss national students. Visit the UKCISA website for detailed information about healthcare for students.

University accommodation

If you have accepted an offer to study with us, you can apply for university accommodation. This applies before and after the UK leaves the EU.

Note that most of our accommodation is reserved for first-year undergraduate students. Find out more about our accommodation.

Staying in the UK after graduation

If the UK leaves with a withdrawal agreement, you will be able to apply for pre-settled or settled status until 30 June 2021. This allows you to stay in the UK.

If there is no deal and you are already resident in the UK, you can apply for pre-settled or settled status by 31 December 2020.

If you are not already resident, you should apply for a European Temporary Leave to Remain. This lets you stay in the UK for three years. After this time, you can apply for a visa.

Academic and professional qualifications

The European Commission has published guidance on professional qualifications.

Some professional qualifications are automatically recognised across the EU and EEA, while others have to be recognised by a Member State.

  • There are no changes if you obtained a professional qualification in the UK before the departure date and it has been recognised by an EU member state. It will still be recognised.
  • If a qualification was obtained, but not recognised, before the departure date, the Commission recommends that Member States take into consideration the fact that the qualification was obtained while the UK was still a member of the EU.
  • Any professional qualifications obtained in the UK after the departure date will be assessed under Member State law and policy.

The professions that are currently covered by automatic recognition are doctors, dentists, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, veterinary surgeons and architects. In the event of no deal, this may change.

UK degrees are recognised in many countries around the world and most academic qualifications should still be recognised after the UK leaves the EU.

Current students

Our EU, EEA and Swiss students are an integral part of our University community. You're free to continue studying with us in the UK.

If the UK leaves the EU with a withdrawal agreement, you (and any family members) may notice a few changes. These are outlined below.

Please note that this information may change if the UK leaves with no deal.

Visas and immigration

Under the terms of the withdrawal agreement, you will not need a visa if you’re already in the UK (on or before the departure date).

If there is no deal and you're already resident in the UK, you can apply for pre-settled or settled status. There's no rush to do this: you have until 30 June 2021.

Tuition fees for EU nationals

Your fees will remain the same as those of UK students for the duration of your course.

Working while studying

Current EU, EEA and Swiss students can continue to work and study in the UK. If you're in the UK now, or arrive during the transition period (departure date–31 December 2020), we encourage you to apply for the EU settlement scheme. You can apply free of charge.

Visit the International Student Advice Service pages on MyAnglia for detailed information.

Health and medical care

The UK Government has confirmed that NHS healthcare will be available to EU, EEA and Swiss national students. Visit the UKCISA website for detailed information about healthcare for students.

Staying in the UK

If you want to stay in the UK after you graduate, you can apply for pre-settled status. This allows you to stay in the UK for five years, at which time you can apply for settled status. Settled status means you can stay in the UK indefinitely.

If you have already been in the UK for five years, you can apply for settled status now.

Erasmus+ students

The UK is part of the Erasmus+ student exchange programme. The current programme runs from 2014–2020.

If the UK agrees a withdrawal agreement, EU students will still be able to study in the UK through the Erasmus+ scheme up to and throughout the 2020/21 academic year. The same is true for UK students who want to study in Europe.

In the event of no deal, the European Commission has said that it will continue to fund Erasmus+ students who are already in the UK at the point of Brexit and the UK Government has confirmed that it will underwrite Erasmus+ grant funding for any UK students who are already on an Erasmus+ exchange programme.

The availability of Erasmus+ funding for outgoing students in 2019/20 has not been confirmed, and may not be available in the event of no deal. Universities are seeking clarification on what will happen if the UK can’t continue to access the Erasmus+ programme.

A new Erasmus+ programme is due to run from 2021-27. It’s not yet clear if the UK will be part of this programme; details will be agreed during the transition period after the UK leaves the EU.

We are working with our partner universities in Europe to make sure that student exchange programmes can still take place in future, whether the UK leaves with or without a deal.

Research partners

We remain committed to our research work and other collaborative activity in Europe – both now and in the future.

Projects that are already underway or that have secured European research funding are not at risk. This includes projects forming part of the Horizon 2020 programme.

In the event of no deal, the UK Government will underwrite Horizon 2020 funding for all projects submitted before the exit. For proposals submitted after the exit, a further ‘Post EU Exit Guarantee Extension’ will cover funding for successful bids open to third country participants. The guarantee would cover the lifetime of their projects, even if these last beyond 2020. After 2020, the European Commission proposes to introduce a new programme called Horizon Europe. The UK will be eligible to participate as a third country.

We know that our collaborative research work – which ranges from supporting ageing populations, mitigating the effects of natural disasters, and developing sources of sustainable energy – brings tangible, positive benefits to society. We fully intend to maintain, and develop, close links with partners across Europe.

ARU staff

Our aim has always been to attract, develop and retain the very best people we can. This includes teaching, research and professional services staff.

The UK’s exit will not affect the immigration status of our EU staff or those that arrive before the end of the Government’s implementation period, which is currently 31 December 2020.

Staff can visit our dedicated page on My.Anglia for more information and advice.

More information

The following websites are reliable sources of information on some of the issues surrounding Brexit. You can also contact us directly if you're interested in studying at ARU.