Sociology MA

Postgraduate (12 months full-time, part-time)

Cambridge

January, September

Intermediate awards: PG Cert, PG Dip

Course duration: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time (September starts); 12 months full-time (January starts).

Teaching times

Part-time

Semester 1: Monday 15:00 - 18:00
Semester 2: Monday 15:00 - 18:00

Overview

Gain an in-depth understanding of the latest issues and debates in sociology. Hone your research skills, and develop expertise that will prepare you for a career in social policy, social work, local government, public service and more.

Full description

Careers

This course will prepare you for work in many fields, including human resources, social policy, social work, educational development, community development, counselling, local government, the civil service, public services and charities.

Or you might decide to continue on to a research degree, like our PhD Sociology.

Modules & assessment

Core modules

  • Contemporary Debates in Sociology
    This module will address key debates in contemporary Sociology, through the in-depth exploration of exemplar topics that currently preoccupy sociological scholars, thinkers, and practitioners. You will attend three sets of combined lecture-seminars, each focused on a distinct topic with accompanying assessment. The topics will be chosen to reflect current and cutting edge issues, but will also link to the broader context the discipline of Sociology. You will be assessed through 3 pieces of analytical writing, undertaken through the trimester, covering each topic, and comprising a total word count of 6000 words. Through this, you will be encouraged to engage with module content from the start of the module delivery, and hone your sociological reading, analytical and writing skills.
  • Postgraduate Research Methods
    This module will provide you with the research skills and techniques needed both to critically evaluate the literature you will be using in your Masters course, and to put into practice in your own Dissertation. It will explore the methodologies and methods applied in contemporary social science research to enable you to select an appropriate range for your own needs.
  • Major Project
    This module will support you in the preparation and submission of a Masters dissertation, allowing you to explore in-depth a particular topic that reflects your academic interest.

Optional modules

  • Nationalisms, Diasporas and Identities
    You will explore notions of identity related to belonging, rootedness and mobility, examining key concepts such as nationalism, transnationalism, diaspora and migration. Particular attention will be paid to intersections with gender, class and ethnicity. You will investigate the notion of 'home' at different spatial scales, while concepts of hybridity will also be examined, especially the growing importance of multi-generational diasporic communities. Your key focus of interest will be second-generation identities. You will draw on detailed case studies in order to ground these concepts and identify their specificities. You will be encouraged to develop case studies informed by your own backgrounds and localities. Your analyses of comparative diasporic and transnational experiences will be developed and interdisciplinarity will also be encouraged. Your assessment will have two elements based on an individually-selected case study: a presentation and a 5,500 word report.
  • Globalisation, Social Welfare & Social Policy
    This module considers the relationship between globalisation and social welfare and policy at a micro, mezzo and macro level. It considers how globalisation impacts on social welfare provision and policy planning in different countries and societal contexts, from a political, social, economic, technological and educational viewpoint. We will evaluate and critically analyse whether there are universal values and a universal knowledge base which can be relied upon to provide a response towards overcoming global problems, or whether they are, or need to be, culturally and locally specific. This module also looks at how individuals, social networks and organisations deal with providing support for those in greatest need and how this can be translated to work within an international arena from both a statutory and voluntary/non-governmental organisation perspective. Finally, we will consider the role of the social welfare and social policy worker within a globalised world, and critically debate universal standards of practice and transferable skills and adaptation.
  • Communication and Conflict
    You will explore historical and thematic approaches to reporting on conflict and also how communication functions in a crisis. You will examine the reciprocal relationships between the military, governments and the media, including how the media can be used to legitimise conflict, and the changing role of social media in building consensus and protest. You will also examine censorship and propaganda, whether the state is ever able to retain control of the narrative, and the role of the war reporter. Your areas of exploration will include consent, public interest, ethics and the representation of suffering. You will also look at how war and conflict is portrayed in fictional accounts and the underlying assumptions of such portrayals, examine conflicting discourses about war in post-conflict environments and consider the way the media can contribute to or hamper the process of post-conflict reconstruction. Your study will examine who owns, defines and propagates the truth, and the implications of this in the context of conflict and war. You will be assessed by a 2,000 word report and an individual presentation. You will also submit weekly analyses of contemporary media reporting on global conflict scenarios.
  • Violence in Context
    This module will present you with theoretical frameworks through which you can analyse why and how violence, as a construct, proliferates globally and locally. You will apply broad theoretical explanations to particular 'violence scenarios', and test more focused, recent research in broader settings. Owing to the multi-faceted nature of violence, literature has often sought to address specific forms of violence discretely, and its study in the Social Sciences has become somewhat fragmented. You will test a range of different theoretical models and apply them to a particular case study of violence. You will also critically evaluate policies and practitioner-based programmes that seek to address violent behaviour, and examine specific scenarios of violence from a range of academic and practitioner-based perspectives. Your assessment will comprise a presentation, four weekly literature reviews and a case study analysis of a violence 'problem'.

Assessment

Depending on the module, you’ll show your progress through a combination of essays, presentations, case studies and portfolio work, as well as a Major Project at the end of the course.

Where you'll study

Your department and faculty

At the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, we believe in thinking critically about the past, present and future to challenge perceptions and better understand communities and people.

With expertise from gender issues to literary analysis to exploring how the past has shaped our modern world, all our staff members are active researchers. This is reflected in our teaching, allowing us to support our students with the latest theories and practices, as well as essential employability advice.

Where can I study?

Cambridge
Lord Ashcroft Building on our Cambridge campus

Our campus is close to the centre of Cambridge, often described as the perfect student city.

Explore our Cambridge campus

Fees & funding

Course fees

UK & EU students, 2019/20 (per year)

£7,500

UK & EU students, 2019/20 (part-time, per year)

£3,750

International students starting 2019/20 (per year)

£13,100

International students starting 2019/20 (part-time, per year)

£6,550

Important fee notes

The part-time course fee assumes that you're studying at half the rate of a full-time student (50% intensity). Course fees will be different if you study over a longer period. All fees are for guidance purposes only.

How do I pay my fees?

Paying upfront

You won't need to pay fees until you've accepted an offer to attend, but you must pay your fees up-front, in full or in instalments.

How to pay your fees directly

International students

You must pay your fees up-front, in full or in instalments. You will also be asked for a deposit or sponsorship letter/financial guarantee. Details will be in your offer letter.

Paying your fees

Funding for UK & EU students

It’s important to decide how to fund your course before applying. Use our finance guide for postgraduate students to learn more about postgraduate loans and other funding options.

We offer a fantastic range of ARU scholarships, which provide extra financial support while you're at university. Find out more about eligibility and how to apply.

Funding for international students

We offer a number of scholarships, as well as an early payment discount. Explore your options:

Entry requirements

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Important additional notes

Our published entry requirements are a guide only and our decision will be based on your overall suitability for the course as well as whether you meet the minimum entry requirements. Other equivalent qualifications may be accepted for entry to this course, please email answers@anglia.ac.uk for further information.

International students

We welcome applications from international and EU students, and accept a range of international qualifications.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you'll need to make sure you meet our English language requirements for postgraduate courses.

Improving your English language skills

If you don't meet our English language requirements, we offer a range of courses which could help you achieve the level required for entry.

We also provide our own English Language Proficiency Test (ELPT) in the UK and overseas. To find out if we are planning to hold an ELPT in your country, contact our country managers.

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Get more information

UK & EU applicants

01245 68 68 68

Enquire online

International applicants

+44 1245 68 68 68

Enquire online